SECCA opened in 1956 as a non-profit visual arts organization in Winston-Salem, NC.

tumblr_mjco89cUVY1rkz363o1_1280.jpg
Keith Haring, 1985

Keith Haring, 1985

The Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art (SECCA) was created in response to a community and regional need for exhibition space devoted to work by area artists.

By 1972, when industrialist James G. Hanes willed his 32-acre estate to the gallery, its scope expanded to represent artists from 11 southeastern states. Renovation of Hanes' English Hunt-style mansion, as well as the construction of an 8,896 square foot gallery addition and receiving area, was completed in 1976.

Peter Callesen

Peter Callesen

SECCA entered its second phase of growth in 1990 with the addition of the new 24,500 square foot contemporary addition to the building.

With the completion of this space, SECCA's vision changed to a national focus on exhibiting art by international contemporary artists while preserving a commitment to southeastern works.
SECCA is dedicated to creative excellence in the visual arts and interpreting the diversity of international contemporary art.The 300-seat McChesney Scott Dunn Auditorium allows the center to offer the community access to contemporary music, drama, dance and film as well as lectures, conferences, and symposia on contemporary art issues.

Following a period of challenging financial situations, the building and operations of SECCA, along with a portion of the grounds, were transferred in 2007 to the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources. SECCA retained its non-profit status, with an independent Advisory Board and became an affiliate of the North Carolina Museum of Art.

Anthony Braxton

Anthony Braxton

Today, nearly 70 percent of SECCA's operating budget is raised by the non-profit Board of Directors. Because of this, SECCA thrives with an ever-changing array of exhibits featuring the world's premier contemporary and Southeastern artists, educational programs, a music series, a film series, and more.

Banner Image: Henji Hirata